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Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-08-2015
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Frequency setting NV memory

Has anyone developed a minimal microprocessor configuration for non-volatile storage of Si5351 frequency commands?

ralphg
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎11-21-2014

Re: Frequency setting NV memory

Hi,

 

We do not provide any way to program the Non-Volatile Memory in Si535x parts. NVM memory is programmed at ATE using the custom part number generated through our Si5350 ClockBuilder Web or Si5351 ClockBuilder Desktop development tools.

 

Regards,

Matt

Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-08-2015

Re: Frequency setting NV memory

Thank you for your response, but perhaps I should rephrase my question.  My objective is to substitute the Si5351 for three crystal oscillators in the LF to VHF ranges.  I assume (correctly?) that once the Si5331 is programmed using your Windows program that a power interruption would cause the Si5331 to lose its setting. If so, I would like to interpose a microprocessor to remember the command sequence (in its non-volatile EAROM) and to reload it following a power-on reset, without going through the Windows program.

ralphg
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎11-21-2014

Re: Frequency setting NV memory

Hi,

 

Yes once the Si5351 is power cycled, the device will revert to the state stored in NVM.

 

If I'm understanding your situation correctly, the goal is to have some way other than the ClockBuilder Desktop tool to program the Si5351 through I2C. The ClockBuilder Desktop tool is not a requirement for programming the device through I2C. You are free to use another programming tool.

 

In the Si5351 datasheet, Figure 12 has outlined the correct I2C programming flow you should follow. We do recommend using ClockBuilder Desktop to help generate your register map. Using these recommended register settings, you can then use your own I2C interface to program the device.

 

I also recommend reviewing AN619, which goes over how to manually generate a register map.

 

Thanks,
Matt

Posts: 8
Registered: ‎07-21-2015

Re: Frequency setting NV memory

Hi Matt

 

I have the same problem for NVM files,i have already downlaod the NVM from the website(SI5351B-B02073-GM),via the I2c interface i could load the files into the menory? and if the power cycle,the files will

be cleared?  for the register map it just revise the RAM adress,not save the NVM file in the memory,it is right?

                              

 

                                                                                                                                                 Tony Suen

Posts: 47
Registered: ‎02-24-2014

Re: Frequency setting NV memory

Tony

 

Si5351 registers written using the I2C interface are volatile and will revert to their default state when the part is power cycled. There is no way to modify the Si5351 NVM outside of the Silicon Labs manufacturing process, however you can create a custom NVM configuration using the Clock Builder software and Silicon Labs will manufacture custom Si5351 parts for you at no extra charge.

 

Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-08-2015

Re: Frequency setting NV memory

Thanks, Matt

 

Ralph Gaze

ralphg
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Posts: 1,167
Registered: ‎04-27-2004

Re: Frequency setting NV memory

[ Edited ]

 You should be able to use the "save C Code header file" and any small SiLabs EFM( MCU (eg EFM8BB1) to write on power up.

 

 Note that the raw saved .TXT register file, goes up to address 232, and we found problems doing the obvious, and simply copying that to a device. It seems > 183 are reserved registers ?

 

However, the C Header file save is NOT the same info - it seems to be smaller, (the one just tested stops at 170 ?),  and with gaps, (eg 92..149)  but also does not match fig 12.

 

SiLabs should fix this so the saved .TXT covers legal registers, and get Fig 12 and the created C header file into sync.

I would also suggest creating an assembler output option, as well as C format.

 

The tool also still only allows two crystal values, but systems may have other crystal choices.

 

It is good to see 200MHz is now supported.